Category: Company Culture

This topic pertains to articles about the relationship between company culture and training are explored. For example, a good safety culture at a company might make training more effective while a poor safety culture can serve to undermine training efforts.

content

6 Types of Content Your Employees Should Know How to Create

There are many reasons why you want your employees to be content creators at and for your organization. When your employees are content creators, you can implement a culture of learning at your organization, endorse transparent communications, and so much more. But you must make sure that your employees know how to create certain types […]

gender

How to Address the Gender Pay Gap at Your Organization

Although the Equal Pay Act of 1963 technically prohibits employers from paying women less money than men in the workplace, research continues to show that women earn less money than men in the workplace (especially women of color), and that women aren’t in as many executive-level roles as men.

awards

5 Awards and Accolades to Present to Your Top Performers

Seminal research indicates that employees value recognition in the workplace more than money. In fact, 83% of respondents to a survey claimed that recognition for contributions at work were more fulfilling to them than any rewards or gifts they’ve received.

millennials

Young Managers Support Flexible Work Arrangements

Companies in today’s job market have to work hard to attract and keep top talent. That means not only paying competitive salaries but also providing solid benefits and a favorable work environment. For many, this last part includes flexible hours and the ability to work remotely some or even all of the time.

reports

Is Your Company Spending Too Much Time with Internal Reports?

A famous scene in the cult classic Office Space shows the protagonist Peter Gibbons being reminded by multiple colleagues and layers of management about a missing cover sheet for his “TPS Report.” The scene was meant to satirize both the superfluous levels of oversight within many organizations and the insignificance of many reporting requirements.