Category: Company Culture

This topic pertains to articles about the relationship between company culture and training are explored. For example, a good safety culture at a company might make training more effective while a poor safety culture can serve to undermine training efforts.

talent

The Importance of Cultivating Talent Outside Your Organization

In this new era of self-service learning, learning as a service (LaaS), and very low unemployment rates, whether it’s easy to accept or not, experts are indicating that leaders must consider cultivating talent outside of their own organizations to continue to prosper in the next decade or so.

debunked

Debunked: 4 Excuses for Not Offering Employees L&D Programs

Executives and working professionals outside of the learning and development (L&D) industry may not always fully understand the importance and impact of L&D, and it’s not unusual for L&D professionals to hear excuses about why these programs aren’t necessary or can’t be executed, especially from executive leadership teams.

learning

3 Important Facts About Smart Learning Environments

Smart learning environments are set to become the future of modern-day workplaces—and sooner than you think. These environments will become even more important to explore as you prepare your employees for the fourth industrial revolution.

people

4 Benefits of a People-Centric Workplace

Many organizations strive for success by centering their strategies and operations on their customers first, but some experts and research claim that such an approach won’t allow an organization to reach its full potential, especially if its company culture doesn’t focus on its employees and people first.

culture

Promoting a Culture of Experimentation and Learning

In several previous posts, we discussed the concept of embracing failure. Failure is a normal part of life and shouldn’t necessarily be treated as an existential catastrophe, but it’s important to learn from it to avoid making the same mistakes.

schedule

Should You Implement a 4-Day Workweek?

Modern-day employees claim they want a better work/life balance and more flexible work schedules; one such flexible schedule is a 4-day workweek, during which employees work 35 to 40 hours in 4 days instead of the traditional 5.

child

How to Offer Child Care as a Workplace Perk

According to research, 85% of parents say they wish their employer offered childcare benefits; almost two-thirds of parents—and 83% of Millennials—say they’d leave one job for another if it offered better family-care benefits; and two-thirds of parents said childcare costs have influenced their overall career decisions.